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i^ 



THE ILLUSTRATIONS OF THE QUARTER. 

By Perriton Maxwell. 

A cloistered philosopher — no less a man for his monkish 

garb — who studied that delicate mechanism the human heart, 

and drank soul -deep from the well of wisdom, once put in 

verbal form the hitherto unexpressed conviction, that to remain 

\&A as &°°d as we are, we must ever strive to become better 

than we are. 

To no set or circle of the world's refined workers 
need the terse theorem be more frequently pointed out 
for thoughtful observance, than to the well-trained 
picturists of our periodic literature. It will be readily 
granted by every attentive follower of letters, that the 
many men and few women who make a business of 
embodying pictorially the creations and realities dealt 
with by the mental artist are too often prone to stray 
from the full meaning of the latter's text. Our best illustrators are open to this 
charge ; our worst ones are perforce painstaking in this regard — their interpreta- 
tions, coarse or careless in an art way, making for absolute and sometimes servile 
adherence to the printed lines. The painter of Simon Pure stripe may revel in 
the luxury of his own ideas and ideals, may pet and fondle his own peculiar point 
of view, may interpret nature and history to the bent of his own sweet will, fancy, 
and caprice ; but even a genius in the field of illustration must harness his art to 




Drawn by A. Brevnan. 

From Life- 

"the lion and the lamb." 




Drawn by J. II. Sharp. 



From Harper s Weekly. Copyright. 

INDIAN DANCE." 



58 



The Quarterly Illustrator 



the vehicle of the writer. The magazine article 
and the magazine illustration are a pretty pan- 
when well mated, well groomed, and of an equal 
high-bred class, but they are inevitably a tandem 
team, and the author is always the fore steed ; 
it does happen at times, however, that the 
" wheeler " carries the load. It should not be 
forgotten, that no matter how individual or 
imaginative the style of a monochromatist, it is 

always the 
province of 
his craft to 
explain with 
brush and 
p e n - p o i n t 
the meaning 
of the types 
among 





Drawn by W. Lewis Sonntag^ Jr. 

From Once A Week. 

"return from the race." 



Drawn by Otto Toaspern. 

" SHOPPING.' 



From Life. 



which his pictures are destined to blossom in 
their reproduced form. The first aim of the 
illustrator should be to illustrate. Detractors 
of the black-and-white art have denounced it, 
off hand, as a superfluity. Absurd denuncia- 
tion. Contrariwise it has become a necessary 
and important adjunct to the best literature 
of our time. More than this, it is the bread, 
cheese, and beer of art. Its beauty is of the 
substantial order, and its rewards are of a piece 
with its grace. 

Glimpsing the foremost illustrated maga- 
zines put out of press within the quarter-year 



gone by, the characteristic 
that forces itself upon one 
and clings to memory is the 
cosmopolitan flavor of their 
pictured pages. Foreign 
artists figure with great 
prominence among the illus- 
trators of the leading Amer- 
ican magazines all through 
the numbers of the past 
year. But why, the draw- 
ings from abroad have not 
themselves explained. From 
the w hole mass of alien 
work no single sketch stands 
out with the mark of genius. 




d 

Drawn by E. IV. Doming. 



Froj/i O it ting. 



" SIOUX CHILDREN.' 



The Quarterly Illustrator 



59 



First came Harpers with a strong attachment 
for English art in black and white ; then an 
affection was displayed by the Century for the 
illustrative work of certain Frenchmen, Ital- 
ians, and Russians. Later the Cosmopolitan 
(true in this instance to its name) and Scrib- 
ner's — gaining artistic strength with each suc- 
cessive moon — have gone to Parisian ateliers 
for a deal of their monochromatic material. It 
may be that the gentle public demands exotic 
art in its periodicals as it demands it in the 
exhibitions. Be it so, native illustrators need 




Drawn by C. li. Grant. F?-om The New York Ledi. 

u AN ANXIOUS MOMENT." 

embellish the leaves of Ameri- 
can literature does not in any 
sense indicate that our own il- 
lustrators have fallen in the pit 
of oblivion. Indeed, no per- 
ceptible diminishment of their 
industry or ideafulness has come 
of the invasion. 

From here and there, with a 
thought mainly to eclecticism of 
subject and treatment, a sheaf 
of monochrome drawings from 
various journals has been gar- 
nered, and is strewn before the 
reader of these pages. Of the 
snappy sketch by Alfred Bren- 
nan — a ponderous, ruminative 
old lion, strangely tolerant of 



Drawn by C. Mente. From Once A Week. 

" THE MAHARAJAH OF KAI'URTH ALA. 1 ' 

have small fear of foreign com- 
petition. The greatest pictures 
in black and white have been 
made in American studios, and 
the future prospect is aglow with 
promise. That foreign illustra- 
tors have been called upon to 




Draw 



>, by T. V. Chsminsky. 

U IN the music room," 



From Life. 



6o 



The Quarterly Illustrator 




firom Once A Week. 



"NEGRO CAM I* MEETING IN IHTCHESS CO.. N. Y. 



the presence of a meek and frail- 
bodied lamb — little can be said ex- 
cept in praise. It has all the qualities 
that make this artist's pen-work unique 
and ever pleasing. A pictorial echo 
of the Ameri- 
can desert and 
the serious 
play of its 
nomadic chil- 
dren is excel- 
1 e n 1 1 y por- 
trayed by J. H. 
Sharp in his 
drawing of a 
ceremonious 
dance of Indi- 
ans. Study 
this picture 
closely and you 
will hear the 
guttural ejacu- 
Dmn^ d y lations of these 

Et/iel Isadora Brown. 

From u/e. stern-face d 

"RlRAl. ENTERPRISE." Wild-meil, Qlld 





Drawn by De Cost Smith 

"THE SKH'X TANNER 



From Outing. 



The Quarterly Illustrator 



61 



the heaving breathing of the youthful squaws. The 
slow, measured patter of bare and moccasined feet, 
the dull plund, pluncl of the snake-skin tom-tom 
further off, the intense earnestness of the dancers 
— all is either pictured by the illustrator of this 
scene, or knowingly suggested by his neat but not 
too laborious drawing. It is as good a thing as 
has been printed in Harper's Weekly during a trio 
of months. Coming to the van of our black-and- 
white elucidators of contemporary life is W. Lewis 
Sonntag, Jr. His is an easy style, brimming with 
suggestive coloring, and strong in its presentation 

of essen- 





Drawn by S. IV. Van Schaick. 



Fro 7ii Life. 



'THE HONEYMOON'. 



tials. Mr. 
S onntag 
has the 
knack of 
ceasing 
work at the 
proper 

place. Having given you a true idea of 
place or person he leaves you to scrape ac- 
quaintance with his drawing, and you are 
flattered by this acknowledgment of your 
discernment and imagination. An admir- 
able quality of this artist's work is its 



From a painting by H. G. Plumb. 

From Demorest's. 



* IN DURANCE VILE. 



straightforward simplicity. His sub- 
jects are clearly drawn ; his method 
clean cut and free. Otto Toaspern 
has studied well the attitude of his two 
women who step from the cross-walk 
to the curb. A woman bends herself 
considerably when mounting a step or 
stairway, and Mr. Toaspern has caught 
the precise action in his little study 
from Life. E. W. Deming gives us in 
his picture from Outing a brief but 
comprehensive glimpse of quiet life in 
an Indian encampment. The children 
and the dogs are the most entertaining 




Drawn by Frank H. Schell. From Frank Leslies' . 
"the vigilant." 



62 



The Quarterly Illustrator 





SlwSr? 



Drawn by S. Crosby. 

" BREAKING IT GENTLY. 3 



From Puck. 



Drawn by Jay Hambridge. 

From McClure's Magazine. 

" A COSTER GIRL." 



features of a tepee village, and the artist, recogniz- 
ing this fact, has rightly placed his youthful braves 
and their canine companion in the foreground of 
his sketch. The work of Charles Mente is often 

- seen in the pages of 
Once a Week, and 
its character is a 
sort of pictorial re- 
porting. Doubtless 
he is a rapid work- 
man. In any event, 
his is a nervous man- 
ner wedded to a fac- 
ulty for centering 
one's interest in the 
main facts of a 
scene — certainly the 
first desideratum of 
a good illustration. 
In the death of 

C, R. Grant a conscientious contributor to the New York Ledger and other illus 

trated papers has been lost. Weak at 

times in a technical way, Mr. Grant never 

failed to give the real point of an episode 

or adventure in his black-and-white ac- 
companiments. Far above the ordinary 

are the drawings of T. V. Chominski. 

Life has absorbed the best of this artist's 

work. It is a broad, intelligent species 

of illustration that Mr. Chominski puts 

forth, and it is of the kind that holds no. 

hint of imitation. In soft gray tones M. 

Colin takes us under the slender branches 

of a young forest and into the very midst 

of a darky camp-meeting. The scene is 

a real one, and has a delightful open-air 

feeling in it. Mr. Colin is a versatile 

contributor to Once a AVeek, in which 

periodical his best work has appeared. 

Ethel Isadore Brown has a delicate touch, 

well indicated in her sketch here given 

from Life. De Cost Smith has made a 

faithful study of the fast-dying life of the 

plains, especially the life of our abori- 
gines. His drawing from Outing is 

breezy and broadly executed. As in all 

his work, the sketch by S. W. Van Schaick 

of Life, reproduced with this, gives one 




Drazun by Hermann Simon. From Outing. 

"SMASHING THROUGH THE BRUSH." 



The Quarterly Illustrator 



the impression that it was made in the teeth of a 
gale— so full of vigor and go is his style. F. H. 
Schell, J. Hambridge, and S. Crosby have ways 
widely divergent, but equally interesting. A sug- 
gestion of instantaneous photography is called to 
mind in viewing Hermann Simon's cleanly made 
drawing of a jumping deer. A lively picture most 
truly, this one. E. M. Ashe, careful, discerning and 
gay ; Joseph P. Birren, a bit stiff but forceful ; F. 
T. Richards, amusing in his theme and clever in 
his method— are three illustrators whose Life work 
has commended itself for reproduction here. A 
touch of effeminacy is in the production of Albert 



63 





Drawn by E. M. Ashe. 

"THE CONSULTATION." 

masterpiece of artistic force and sug- 
gested color. C. J. Taylor has executed 
better drawings than 
the example given 
with the types of 
this page, but the 
extreme economy of 
line with which he 
has shadowed upon 
white paper a table 
scene with five per- 
sons and a Delft 
plaque is worth a 
half hour's study. 
Suave and simple is 
the drawing by H. 
B. Wechsler, whose 
brush portrayals ap- 
pear with pleasing 
frequency in Life. 
Non-essential details 
do not cumber the 



Drawn by Joseph P. Birren. 

From Outing. 

" AT THE FOOT-BALI. GAME." 



Scott Cox, but the action of his 
figures is excellent. A painter- 
like, substantial quality fills the 
monochrone by Parker New- 
ton. His picture is a cameo 




V 







Drawn by 

Grace Hudson. 
From Overland. 




'THE LEGGIN GIRL. 



Drawn by Albert Scott Cox. F?-om Once A Week. 

"THE COUNTRY COUSIN INTERCEPTED." 



6 4 



The Quarterly Illustrator 



pictures of this illustrator. His women 
are refined, but not prudish ; his men 
are sensible fellows, whose clothes fit 
as well upon their persons as their dia- I ->/£«§! 
logues become their surroundings. The | 
truth of it is that Mr. Wechsler under- 
stands this business of reflecting flesh- 





Drawn by Parker Newton. From Once A Week. 

"DESTROYING A DERELICT."' 



a nd - b 1 o o d 
people amid 
their actual 
environment. 
Thus has- 
tily surveyed, the illustrations of the vanished quarter are 
neither the least nor the greatest of the year, but have in 
them enough of the entertaining and artistically merito- 
rious to warrant 



Drawn by A T. Richards. 

From Life. 
"he took her side." 



study and chal- 
lenge opinion. 
T h e essence of 
successful mono- 
chrome picture- 
men t is not in the 
illustrator's mannerisms nor his ready com- 
prehension of reproductive values, but in 
the fitness of the picture to the text. The 
artist with gifts of his own who can most 
fully appreciate this fact, must needs rise to 
the pinnacle of his profession. 

Outlooking upon the stirring sea of con- 
temporary illustration, the view is an en- 
gaging one at the moment. There is a 








Drawn by H B. Wechsler. 

"TRIALS OF AN AMERICAN HEIRESS. 1 



Drawn by C. J. i ay lor. 

" OBTRUSIVE." 

healthy strife for supremacy among 
the smaller and newer craft which sail 
month after month before our vision, 
and with the older, stancher vessel- 
there is a closer trimming of sails and 
a keener zest in the race 
for the stake-boat of popu- 
larity. AVe who watch the 
contest from the shore can 
at least wave a welcome to 
each newcomer and cheer 
along the old, familiar 
From Life racers in their accustomed 
course. 



The Quarterly Illustrator 



65 




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DAX BEARD. 



CHARLES C. CURRAN. 



66 



The Quarterly Illustrator 





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The Quarterly Illustrator 



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68 



The Quarterly Illustrator 




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